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Diamond Factory

The kaleidoscope art for Diamond Factory.

(c) 2013-2017 Windy Johansen

Diamond Factory

rocks became pulverized rocks
pulverized rocks became glass

no potential here, what a mess
is there no potential here?
can’t I learn from this?

a growing potential
if glass can be sand again

the glass that cut my foot
and the soft sand
together again

it hurts and I don’t want it to
it hurts, but it’s a diamond factory

rocks became pulverized rocks
pulverized rocks became glass

no potential here, what a mess
is there no potential here?
can’t I learn from this?

as the sand in the glass
meets the glass in the sand

the glass that cut my foot
and the soft sand
together again

it hurts and I don’t want it to
it hurts, but it’s a diamond factory

(c) 2014-2017 Windy Johansen

Poem: Searching for One Moment

kaleidoscope

(c) 12 Nov 2013 Windy Johansen

on this separate road
we’re crawling among the pebbles
among the sharp pebbles

on this separate road
we’re searching in this stale desert
in this stale desert

searching for one moment

you and I cry
and we cry and, oh
in crying we become

a fountain gushing
sadness is, sadness is,
an unfinished statement
sadness is, sadness is
sadness is not everything

and there will be a new day

in these desperate eyes, you’ll see
we’re changing into new people
into new people

searching for one moment

you and I cry
and we cry and, oh
in crying we become

a fountain gushing
sadness is, sadness is,
an unfinished statement
sadness is, sadness is
sadness is not everything

and there will be a new day

nevermind yesterday
searching for one moment
nevermind tomorrow
searching for one moment
nevermind our whole future
searching for one moment, one single moment

(c) 31 July 2013 Windy Johansen

Poem: Beautiful Places to Wake Up

kaleidoscope

(c) 2013 Windy Johansen

Beautiful Places to Wake Up
warm light from candles
resting with calming light
each candle with its own place
each candle sharing its own light

such a beautiful place
so many beautiful places
to wake up, to find light

cool wind wraps around
flying with calming grace
each gust with its own place
each gust sharing its own life

such a beautiful place
so many beautiful places
to wake up, to find light

cold waves of the sea
taking my worried tides
each wave with its own place
each wave sharing its own gift

such a beautiful place
so many beautiful places
to wake up, to find light

(c) 22 September 2013 Windy Johansen

kaleidoscope

(c) 2013 Windy Johansen

Poem: Light from Simplicity

(I’m posting my poems again. They may be awesome, they may be terrible. But I hope they make you feel better. Or that they make you feel like writing something. Or both. Both would be awesome.)

kaleidoscope

(c) 2013 Windy Johansen

Light from Simplicity
fluttering stars
made of paper

luminous, light from simplicity

green and gold notes
two inks, one form

colorful, light from simplicity

twirling stars
born to dance

luminous, light from simplicity

expressive notes
rainbows, so small

colorful, light from simplicity

(c) 21 September 2013 Windy Johansen

kaleidoscope

(c) 2013 Windy Johansen

A Poetic Look At: Haiku

Kaleidoscope

(c) 2013 Windy Johansen

So…why haiku this time?

Because they are popular, and I love them. Additionally, they are an interesting example of how other languages handle and organize sounds and words into poetry. In English, we use meter. Other languages do not use meter, or do not use it as English does.

But I know about haiku.

That’s great! It helps to build on something that we already know when trying to learn new things.

Okay, so…how do haiku work?

(I know I was taught a fair bit about haiku as a child, but I am going to talk as if you all don’t know many of these things. Therefore no one will be lost or confused.)

Haiku is a Japanese poetic form. Haiku have a single stanza of three lines. Line one is five syllables, line two is seven syllables, line three is five syllables again. This is what most people are taught.

In researching this, I discovered that haiku don’t have three lines when written in Japanese. They have only one; the three lines in English-language haiku point back to the three phrases that haiku have in Japanese.

Syllables, Morae and On

Japanese syllables are not syllables, but on (or morae). Japanese on are all the same length. Stress is more or less the same across all on. Since Japanese is a tonal language, you may hear high-tone on as stress. (Japanese has two tones. The other is low-tone.)

Haiku were once referred to as hokku. They grew out of renku (hokku is still the name for the first verse of a renku poem), and were viewed in that context for a time. In order to truly separate haiku from renku, Masaoka Shiki, a haiku author, suggested the name of haiku (an abbreviation of haikai no ku).

You told me that every poetic form has a recipe. What’s the recipe this time?

On (which we already talked about), a kigo, and the idea of kireji.

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